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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

1 edition of hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (nearctic zone) found in the catalog.

hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (nearctic zone)

hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (nearctic zone)

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station in St. Paul, Minn .
Written in English

    Places:
  • North America.
    • Subjects:
    • Aquatic ecology -- North America.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJames R. Maxwell ... [et al.].
      SeriesGeneral technical report NC ;, 176
      ContributionsMaxwell, James R., North Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul, Minn.)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQH541.5.W3 H54 1996
      The Physical Object
      Pagination72 p. :
      Number of Pages72
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL541141M
      LC Control Number96120419
      OCLC/WorldCa33809153

      One of the better known efforts—pioneered in the Pacific Northwest of the United States—is a hierarchical ecological framework that separates biodiversity into compositional, structural, and. Freshwater Ecoregions of North America: A Conservation Assessment. Island Press, Washington, DC, USA. Additional text provided by Jennifer Hales. "Terrestrial ecoregions of North America: A conservation assessment" Washington, D.C.: World Wildlife Fund. \A hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (Nearctic.

        Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05 Outputs The Unit continued research to improve the Hierarchical Framework for Classifying Aquatic Units which was published earlier by the North Central Research Station. The framework has been adopted for use in the Natural Resources Inventory System aquatic module and forms the basis for the completely rewritten Aquatic Ecological Unit Inventory field . Freshwater Ecoregions of North America: A Conservation Assessment. Island Press, Washington, DC, USA. \A hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (Nearctic Zone)\ St. Paul, MN. \A national ecological framework for Canada\ Ottawa/Hull, Ontario, Canada.

      Delineation of Ecological Subregions of the Conterminous United States David Cleland, James Keys, and Henry McNab U.S. Forest Service An application of the National Hierarchical Framework of Terrestrial Ecological Units Land Units Landscapes Subregions Ecoregions GJN ‘ Subsequently, this ecoregion framework was expanded to include Alaska and all of North America, revised, and made hierarchical (Gallant and others, ; Omernik, b; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ). Level I is the coarsest level in the ecoregion hierarchy; it divides North America into 15 ecological regions.


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Hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (nearctic zone) Download PDF EPUB FB2

A hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America (nearctic zone) Author: James R Maxwell ; North Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul, Minn.).

A Hierarchical Framework of Aquatic Ecological Units in North America (Nearctic Zone) St. Paul (MN) USDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment StationCited by: The hierarchical framework of ecological units was developed to improve our ability to implement ecosystem management.

This framework, in combination with other information sources, is playing an. Inas part of the Forest Service's National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units (ECOMAP ), ecoregions were adopted for use in ecosystem management.

They will also be used in the proposed National Interagency Ecoregion-Based Ecological Assessments. This volume updates the knowledge of the subject. National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units.

Published in, Boyce, M. ; Haney, A., ed. Ecosystem Management Applications for Sustainable Forest and Wildlife Size: 46KB. Hierarchical Framework of Aquatic Ecological Units (Maxwell et al. ), using physical and biological criteria deemed important to aquatic ecosystems.

Both frameworks called for the systematic classification and mapping of ecological units at scales ranging from global levels down to project levels (Cleland et al. Ecological regionalization according to the USDA Forest Service National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units was undertaken for the New England-New York region.

A topdown, map-overlay approach was used to map sections and by: We present an objective, multi-scale hydrospatial framework for nearshore areas of the Great Lakes.

Framework consists of spatial units at eight hierarchical scales from the North American Continent to the individual m spatial cell. Characterization of spatial units based on fish abundance and diversity provides a fish-guided classification of aquatic areas at each spatial scale Cited by: They are based on the scale-flexible hierarchical framework of nested ecological units delineated by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC).

These ecoregions encompass areas that are similar in their biotic (e.g., plant and wildlife) and abiotic (e.g., soils, drainage patterns, temperature, and annual precipitation) characteristics. The National Hierarchy Framework of Ecological Units (hereafter referred to as the National Hierarchy) is a land classification hierarchy that provides a framework for developing TEUs at continental to local scales.

Since this is a nested hierarchy, finer- level classes are descendants of higher-level classes and have their characteristics.

Ecological regionalization according to the USDA Forest Service National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units was undertaken for the New England-New York region.

A top-down, map-overlay approach was used to map sections and by: Ecological systems are fundamentally hierarchical systems in which we encounter hierarchies of organization and spatial and temporal scale.

These scales often correspond to ‘levels’ in a hierarchical model. In this book, we address inference at a number of different ecological scales and organizational systems, including populations, metapopulations, communities, and metacommunities (Table. A hierarchical framework of aquatic ecological units in North America James Roy Maxwell, Clayton J.

Edwards, +3 authors M. Donley Environmental Science, Materials Science. Hierarchical Framework of Aquatic Ecological Units in North America Nearctic Zone by Clayton J.

Edwards, Mark E. Jensen, Harry Parrott, James R. Maxwell, Steven Paustian, Steven J. Paustian, Donley M. Hill. of Ecological Units (USDA, ) and a Hierarchical Framework of Aquatic Ecological Units in North America (Maxwell et al, ).

It is desirable that a geomorphic classification system be based on geomorphic process. The National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units is a regionalization, classification and mapping system that provides a systematic method for classifying and mapping areas of the Earth based on associations of ecological factors at different geographic Size: 98KB.

Ecology (from Greek: οἶκος, "house", or "environment"; -λογία, "study of") is a branch of biology concerning interactions among organisms and their biophysical environment, which includes both biotic and abiotic components. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species.

From the Ecological Units of the Forest Service National Hierarchical Framework, smaller areas within Sections with similar surficial geology, lithology, geomorphic process, soil groups, subregional climate, and potential natural communities.

FS_EcoregionSubsection is the. The sixth in the Eastern Seed Zone Forum's online lecture and discussion series aimed at providing both information about the creation of seed zones in general and a forum in which professionals, experts, and interested parties discuss the possibility of drafting seed zone guidelines for the eastern United States.

In this webinar, Dr. Greg Nowacki, Regional Ecologist, Acting Soil Program. Development of Subregions of the Conterminous United States Gregory Nowacki & David Cleland Regional Ecologists Implementation of the National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units • Classification of mountain lakes in western North America, George Lienkaemper, USGS Forest & Rangeland Ecosystem Science.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Forest Service have developed an Ecological Classification System (ECS) for ecological mapping and landscape classification in Minnesota following the National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units (ECOMAP ).

Ecological land classifications are used to identify, describe, and map progressively smaller areas of land with .Landtype Associations (LTAs) are units of the National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units (NHFEU), a hierarchical ecological land classification system. LTAs are much smaller than Ecological Landscapes, ranging in size f andacres.

Ecological mapping and descriptions follow the USDA Forest Service's National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units (ECOMAPCleland et al. ). This map is the first approximation of subregion ecological units developed for the conterminous United States.