Last edited by Zoloran
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of effect of selected educational strategies on the success of secondary at-risk students found in the catalog.

effect of selected educational strategies on the success of secondary at-risk students

Judith A. Yann

effect of selected educational strategies on the success of secondary at-risk students

by Judith A. Yann

  • 165 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Socially handicapped children -- Education (Secondary),
  • Underachievers.,
  • Mentoring in education.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Judith A. Yann.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination66 leaves, bound ;
    Number of Pages66
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15198598M

    effects of reading intervention strategies for elementary students at-risk of reading disabilities. by. traci j. busick. submittted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of master of arts in education at northern michigan university. novem approved by: date. Transitions from Elementary to Secondary School: A Literature Review Z I. Introduction In an effort to retain more youth in secondary school, and to provide optimal success for all students, the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training has implemented Phase III of the Student Success strategy.

      Methods: The present study was systematic review. The articles in Science Direct, PubMed and Scopus databases and Google Scholar search engine were searched using the keywords of classroom management, students’ disruptive behaviors, difficult students, and confrontation strategies during Author: Tayebeh Mahvar, Mansoureh Ashghali Farahani, Aidin Aryankhesal.   For those students who are at risk of not mastering grade-level expectations or not passing state-mandated tests, we also offer targeted after-school tutorials with a different teacher who changes up delivery and instructional strategies to help meet the needs of all learners.

    Academic Failure in Secondary School. In the U.S. educational system, student advancement is predicated on graded performance in a series of classes. Failing to achieve passing grades has numerous additional implications during secondary school, above and beyond students’ overall individual achievement by: The third feature of learning-oriented software is its ability to enable elaborate and efficient designs for teaching strategies and learning scenarios. The steps and procedures of the aforementioned teaching strategies, such as inquiry, cooperation, game-based learning, Cited by:


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Effect of selected educational strategies on the success of secondary at-risk students by Judith A. Yann Download PDF EPUB FB2

This study's results determined that certain educational strategies did effect at-risk students' success. Analysis of the individual student results, showed improvement, in at least, one of the identified areas.

In the area of attendance, four of the subjects showed marked : Judith A. Yann. For these at-risk students, achieving at or above the 80 percent level is sometimes their first experience of school success, and survey results indicate that their self-esteem is greatly enhanced as a result.

Achieving 80 percent mastery also insures that students will be ready to take the next step in whatever learning sequence they are Size: 75KB. It targets the psychosocial and educational barriers to student success. The model does that in two ways. First, it aims to consolidate and coordinate student and learning supports—the counseling services, school prevention and intervention programs, and community resources that tend to be fragmented and uncoordinated at many schools.

At-risk students are those who, due to environmental circumstances, family history, developmental issues or behavioral problems, are at increased risk of dropping out of school, performing poorly, or experiencing or contributing to violence. There's no single method all schools use for dealing with at-risk students, and some schools have better policies and procedures for helping students at risk than others.

the observed deterioration in the academic achievement, attitude and values of secondary school students in public secondary schools, one wonders if the high failure rates and the failure of the students especially in external examinations is not a reflection of the instructional quality in the schools.

Therefore, the ineffectiveness of teachers in. Academically at-risk students are a heterogeneous population. There are many ways for students to be considered “at - risk” for lower academic achievement and school dropout. T eaching “at risk” Students: Meeting Their Needs “Evidence suggests a general conclusion that being accepted, included or w elcomed leads to a variety of positi ve emotions (e.g.

All journal articles featured in Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk (JESPAR) vol 25 issue 2. students and deliver the essential content in a resilience and wellbeing, drug education or road safety context.

Adapting teaching and learning strategies The strategies linked to learning activities are a suggestion only. As teachers know their students learning styles and needs they can select alternative strategies or adapt those. The At-Risk Student Intervention Implementation Guide could not have been completed without the valuable contributions from the following people, who worked tirelessly conceptualizing the project, researching and reviewing the programs, and preparing this tool for addressing one of South Carolina’s most pressing needs.

Thirty Teaching Strategies Used by Teachers of At-Risk Students. George, Robert G.; Antes, Richard L. In Phi Delta Kappa conducted a national survey in approximately communities in North America which involved schools at each of the elementary, junior high, and high school : Robert G.

George, Richard L. Antes. Comprehensive high schools have been unable to meet the needs of all students (Cotton, ). Students face challenges, and some have been labeled "at risk" for various reasons.

These students constitute a unique group who often require more time, energy, and resources than large, comprehensive schools can offer.

at-risk students. Levin and Hopfenberg () showed through analysis that remediation, often a primary strategy for education of at-risk students, actually slowed down their progress and placed them farther and farther behind the mainstream student population.

teachers at Hawthorne to select and implement several educational strategies geared toward helping at-risk students.

One such program staff at Hawthorne have successfully adapted to incorporate the experiences of their predominantly minority population is Core Knowledge, a curricular program based on Hirsch's () treatise, Cultural Literacy.

Education Reforms and Students at Risk: A Review of the Current State of the Art - January EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The need to "raise the performance of at-risk youth" has become a popular rallying cry for school reform, yet there is often confusion or disagreement about which children are at risk, why they are at risk, and what can be done to improve their chances for success in school and.

Identifying At-Risk Factors That Affect College Student Success Joann Horton1 Abstract All too often, both traditional and non-traditional students face a variety of barriers to learning that put them at risk of failure in achieving their goals. This article explores twenty key factors that impact student learning and success in collegeFile Size: KB.

Research indicates that early integration of rigorous coursework and a focus on college readiness in secondary school curricula in part increases the likelihood that low-income students will graduate from high school and : Kelley Taylor. Classroom Behavioural Strategies and Interventions 3. Rehearse/Guided students practise the routine, corrective feedback is provided by the teacher.

Advanced students can role-play the steps or act as a “buddy” to a student who is alcohol-affected. The teacher uses subtle prompts to help students who forget steps.

This chapter considers school-based strategies for improving substantially the educational outcomes of at-risk students, beginning with an overview of the crisis of at-risk students. The next section examines the prospect of improving the education of at-risk students simply by increasing educational expenditures, followed by a review of cost.

Effective Schooling Practices and At-Risk Youth: What the Research Shows November schools research will yield knowledge which can be applied in providing quality education to at-risk students. Second, it is equally important to point out that some researchers sound the warning SUCCESSFUL STRATEGIES FOR AT-RISK STUDENTSFile Size: KB.

ASCD Customer Service. Phone Monday through Friday a.m p.m. ASCD () Address North Beauregard St. Alexandria, VA Part of being a good teacher is knowing how to reach as many students as possible. This lesson will help you think about what it means to call a student at-risk, and how you can best work with.Differentiating and ensuring success 76 Varying forms of learner engagement 78 Expectations and challenge 81 Interpersonal relations 82 Teacher-pupil relations 82 Peer relations 85 Summary 87 Chapter 8.

Effective Teaching and Learning for Low Attaining Pupils – an overview discussion. 89 Introduction 89File Size: KB.